The Laws of Nature

Monday, April 12, 2010

Success and Other Abstractions

Dinner Party by Judy Chicago

Presently, I'm searching through my art library to find the next great book to review. In the meantime, I just received the most recent issue of "Art Calendar" and found an article of interest. 25 Golden Rules of Success by Renee Phillips is a concise 2-page article found on pages 14 & 15. There are some great tips to be found, but I always consider the title before reading.

rules - Most artists, who are typically free-thinking, react to the word "rules" like an allergic reaction. But, there's no denying that some practices almost always work and are advisable.

golden - "Golden" rules are those that cannot be improved upon, and here we have twenty five!

success - Here's a subjective term. What IS success? The dictionary defines it as a desired outcome, which could be as diverse as the number of people on this planet.

What are these Golden Rules? Here's a short synopsis of the 25 rules lumped into 7 general categories that I've assigned:

Planning
Implementing your plans
Record-keeping and journaling
Delegating
Positive thinking
Continuing education
Taking care of your mental and physical health

When you read the article for yourself you'll be able to consider the author's individual rules and advice offered. It's useful and fairly comprehensive. However, I've got to add one important rule that was omitted:

Keep your mind open to unexpected opportunities.

I'm great at making plans and implementing them, but many of my best experiences as an artist arrived from unexpected sources. Although my first reaction is one of caution, I try not to say "no" immediately. Rather, I take the time to consider the proposal and then decide what to do. So, expect the unexpected and be open to the possibilities. As John Lennon would say, "Imagine."

Your thoughts??

8 comments:

hwfarber said...

Ah--"Dinner Party."

Of the seven categories, only one--continuing education--applies to my life. However, I think my mind is so open that images easily enter--and exit. I occasionally catch one.

Kathy said...

Hi Hallie - it's wonderful that your mind is so open to the ebb and flow of ideas and images. What an asset!

-Don said...

Well, I'm seven for seven, although delegating can be a bit of a challenge since there's only one of me and the dog doesn't take instruction very well...

I look forward to getting my issue of Art Calendar. It must be stuck in the mail somewhere...

-Don

PAMO said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
hwfarber said...

Hi Kathy. A mind with images entering and exiting could be an asset--or could be dementia! A smidgen of organization would be helpful.

Mary Paquet said...

Hi, Kathy, first, let me commend you on your stamina for your recent 40-hour marathon travel. Wow! And I sure do appreciate your sharing your activities with us. I will be in NYC soon, so I will consider adding a few of these places to my list.

I'm pretty good at all but delegating. I am a doer extraordinaire. However, I know enough to set limits to maintain good mental and physical health, though those the limits are pretty far out there.

Stan Kurth said...

I don't delegate well; kinda like Rodney Dangerfield adjusting his tie. I like your addition to the seven and I do keep my eyes open for those unexpected opportunities. I can say with confidence I expect the unexpected. When I was younger I reacted to the unexpected with dismissal, as if it were a plight of hindrance. Now I'm a little more contemplative.

Kathy said...

Hi Don - I haven't figured out the "delegate " part either. Maybe my alter-ego can help out??

Hi Pam - although I always dread the hard work and decision-making I have to do when I clean out my studio from time to time, it is mentally refreshing as you mentioned. It's a great way to begin anew. have fun!

Hi Hallie - organizing thoughts give me a headache!

Hi Mary - reluctantly, I've set limits in my advancing years and truly miss the energy of my youth!
Hope you have a great time in NYC. There's so much to do, and that's why I keep going back.

Hi Stan - me, too!